There are many types of gymnastics comprising Acrobatics, Aerobics, Trampoline, Parkour, General Gymnastics, Artistic Gymnastics and Rhythmic Gymnastics. Rhythmic gymnastics is a discipline performed mostly by women combining agility, artistry and grace accompanied by expressive interpretation of music, while manipulating different types of apparatus.

TYPES OF RHYTHMIC GYMNASTICS

Rhythmic Gymnastics comprises the Individual, Group and Aesthetic competition.

HISTORY

Rhythmic gymnastics is an illustration of expression through movement using rhythm and dance, founded by Jean Georges Noverre and Francois Delsarte towards the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries;

The Federation of International Gymnastics (FIG) officially recognised rhythmic gymnastics in 1962;

The inaugural World Championships was held at Budapest, Hungary in 1963;

Rhythmic gymnastics was subsequently added as an Olympic sport in 1984.

INTERESTING FACT

In recent development in several countries, rhythmic gymnastics is offered to men
combining artistic gymnastics and martial arts, while manipulating different types of apparatus as opposed to women’s rhythmic gymnastics.

fact

APPARATUS

The apparatus used should be in constant motion with great variety of amplitude, direction, plane, shape and speed.

ball

BALL

  • The ball is made of either rubber or synthetic material;
  • The size ranges from 15cm in diameter and weighs a minimum of 260g for junior and 18.5cm in diameter and weighs a minimum of 400g for senior category;
  • The ball may be of any colour.

What to Watch:

Fundamental requirements include bounces, rolls, and throws and catches of the ball. The ball should not be grasped, however should rest in the hand and not against the wrist.

ball

CLUBS

  • The clubs are made of either synthetic material or wood;
  • The size ranges from 36cm in length and weighs a minimum of 100g each for junior and 45cm in length and weighs a minimum of 150g each for senior
    category;
  • The clubs may be of a natural colour or be partially or fully covered by one
    or several colours using adhesive tape either of the same or different colour as the clubs.

What to Watch:

Fundamental requirements include circles, mills, rhythmical tapping, and throws and catches.

ball

FREEHAND

  • The freehand routine is performed without using any apparatus and
    accompanied by music.

What to Watch:

Fundamental requirements include the ability to perform effortlessly with graceful synchronisation to the music with body difficulties comprising balance, flexibility, jump and pivot.

ball

HOOP

  • The hoop is made of either plastic or wood;
  • The size ranges from 60, 70, 80, 85 and 90cm in diameter and weighs a
    minimum of 300g;
  • The hoop may be of a natural colour or be partially or fully covered by one or several colours using adhesive tape either of the same or different colour as the hoop.

What to Watch:

Fundamental requirements include passes through and over the hoop, rotations
around the hand or body, rolls, spins, and throws and catches.

ball

RIBBON

  • The ribbon is made of either satin or similar material cloth attached to a stick made of synthetic material or wood;
  • The ribbon length varies from 5m for junior and 6m for senior category;
  • The ribbon may be of any colour.

What to Watch:

Fundamental requirements include figure of eights, flicks, pattern of circles, snakes and spirals, and throws and catches. The ribbon should be constantly in motion throughout the routine without entangling or forming knots.

ball

ROPE

  • The rope is made of either hemp or synthetic material;
  • The rope length is proportional to the height of the gymnast and must reach both the gymnast underarms when held down by the feet;
  • The rope is kept hold by a knot at each end and must be coloured, either all or partially.

What to Watch:

Fundamental requirements include figure of eights, jumps and leaps through the folded or open rope, rotations, throws and catches, and wrap.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Top